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20130801
20130831
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MSNBC 10
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English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
and the administration is absolutely right when they say they want and america wants inclusive tolerant institutions in egypt. the question is, how do build them, and we -- the way to build them is not to burn them down. that's why i think we should retain our strong rlelationship with the military. not because we condone it or agree with it, it's the only power in town. if we going rebuild egypts institution, it's better to rebuild from within than burn them down and start from scratch. simply put, the big state is better than no state. that's the only choice facing us nous. >> countries at odds with each other. israel and the non-secular people, the black costuming people, who really want a religious state's in people in northern ireland who want to be forever a part of britain and others who very much want to be a republic of ireland. here are here want sharia led, real islamic law, political power and other people who are just egyptians who want to live the way egyptians have lived for thousands of years. can they be co-habitating? is in a model for them to cohabitate that country? >> that's a q
veterans of america, represents nearly 200,000 people, many of whom are young vets. msnbc contributor bill briggs joins me now with his report on this. bill, we've talked so much about the suicide rate and the problems, though, that these vets cite, sadly, are things that you would think could be addressed by our government, including getting their benefits when they retire and some other things that can be taken care of for them. >> yeah, the backlog on benefit -- receiving their benefits is enormous. that's contributing to this problem and has been for several years. it's such a complex issue, and it involves so many realities of coming home from war, reintegrating with your family, reintegrating with your community, finding a job, substance abuse. it's a very complex issue that i think some experts are finally starting to get a handle on maybe what's triggering this spike. >> and what do they believe is the key component? and i feel terrible trying to minimize this to one thing because as you pointed out, it's a laundry list of things these men and women face. >> yeah, what's really int
that was badly needed in america not only for those in attendance but those who could hear and see on television and to send a message to washington, to the state houses, to the local levels that the movement is still alive. and we have to believe that, and we have to act on it. i'm one of the old citizens of the time. i could not help but reflect on things such as the fact that we were not allowed -- people of color were not allowed on television shows. we did hold places in government. i used the theme that had such a negative connotation, stand your ground. i hope i got over to the crowd we need to seize that and use it as our own in a positive way. stand our ground for what we believe, for what we have worked and for what we have died for and move forward. >> it's a reclamation of that spiritual "we shall not be moved" that version of stand your ground. i love what you said about the young people. there was a group from howard university right there near where our msnbc stand was all day. i could sort of watch and see how they were responding. but it was also important what you just said abo
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
is truly a global citizen, though he was born in the united states of america, i think part of me wonders how much this weighs on him. certainly i think the problems he faces domestically must weigh on him. to be president of the united states at a time when there is slaughter happening in syria to the tune of 100,000 people killed, 1.7 million refugees flooding into other parts of the arab world, egypt, which is completely destabilized where you have atrocities happening, slayings of people on buses, unarmed civilians, tear gas and/or chemical attacks in syria, it is, i think, hard to sort of reconcile what we think of the president and who he is as a man. >> right. >> with the inaction from the courthous white house. i wonder what your take is on that knowing him as you do. >> i'm sure that weighs on him terribly. he's also a pragmatic man. he has advisers who are telling him what his options are and what our options are and they are limited. that's not a satisfying thing to hear and it's frustrating but he's also realistic. he knows some of these things, what you want to do takes time.
of america, of giving asylum to edward snowden, the president absolutely cannot go to a bilateral conversation with vladimir putin. >> so there's always a little moment for me, when condi rice and president obama are on the same policy page that always makes me want to pause and say, let's talk about that. do you agree? >> absolutely. i think the reset was great. they got as much out of it as you could. they got the start treaty, the transit route to afghanistan through russia, but then, things started to kind of go sour around the time of libya. the russians felt duped. they had abstained from vetoing at the security council. they couldn't vote in favor of it, but they abstained and felt the u.s. did a lot more than they said they were going to do. on their watch, qaddafi was killed. and the ambassador was harassed for months on the ground, in a very unprofessional, very sort of, this is not what states do to each other. and it went on from there. syria was a major irritant. and what you heard from the white house during this period was like, look, if you guys don't want to talk,
in america." the pendulum is swinging in the republican party now. as the party moves hard right, will they really try another establishment time like romney or dole or mccain or christie or jeb bush? or will the party go for one of its tea party heroes like rand paul? here with me now is the author of the great book "collision 2016." dan, let's talk about what you call the subterranean campaign of 2012 and what it offers us in the future. >> we think of the campaign as the campaign we all cover all the time. everything we talk about, every utterance, every gaffe, every debate, every movement. and that's part of politics and in many ways the interesting and enjoyable part of politics, but it's not necessarily the decisive part of politics. there are important and powerful underlying forces that effect every campaign. in 2012, one was the economy. would it be just good enough to allow president obama to win re-election or bad enough to deny re-election. another was voter anger. which direction would it go? a third was the deep red/blue divide and how that shaped attitudes beyond w
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)